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Battle for Midway

Battle for Midway
1:23:19 | 1999

Categories: Documentary, War, History

One thousand miles from anywhere lay a lonely outpost of coral and sea called Midway. It was here in 1942 where the U.S. and Japan fought one of the greatest naval battles of World War II that changed the course of history - THE BATTLE FOR MIDWAY. And it is here again where Titanic discoverer Dr. Robert Ballard now leads a team of experts and four World War II veterans on the voyage of their lives. They're on a race against time to do the impossible: find at least one of the five downed aircraft carriers. Join them as they pay their final respects to their fallen comrades.

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null
i********m
June 1, 2015
A
Tim Phillips
t********m
January 28, 2014
A
John Collins
j********t
January 15, 2014
A
Gary Austin
q********m
January 5, 2014
A-
Michael Buscio
m********m
November 6, 2013
A
leslie
l********m
November 2, 2013
good show went to school with a girl who became a flyer she was a good gymnist I liked the true to lifeness of the whole show and the chocies we make and where they take us
Timothy Klaer
k********m
August 31, 2013
A
Loyal Griggs
1********g
January 29, 2013
Has anyone ever heard of A.V.G. And, or the exiedition force, we were killing "Japs" long before Dec. 7, 1941, so for sure we started the ruckus. It was a dam good little war I'd say!
Barbara Vandewalle
1********g
January 29, 2013
My dad was in the US Navy and was at the Battle of Midway. He would never talk about the battle.
Art Brecher
1********g
October 1, 2012
The Battle for Midway was won in a large part due to the efforts of Naval Cryptology personnel who had at least partially broken Japanese codes and thus knew the Japanese intentions. They (The Japanese) never really had much of a chance anyway; a small nation with almost no natural resources pitted against the power of the mightiest industrial nation the world has ever seen. It also didn't help their cause that the Japanese Army and Japanese Navy almost never spoke to each other.
Rick Desper
6********g
January 29, 2013
By the time the Japanese attacked Pearl Harbor, they had the resources of most of East Asia. Agree about the code-breaking and the fact that the Americans did a much better job putting the industrial base to work.
Terry Krueger
1********g
July 22, 2012
Truly the greatest generation of Americans.
Micheal Stone Sr.
1********g
January 29, 2013
My Dad was in the 101st Airborne, jumped at4 in the morning on D-Day, regrouped in England and jumped back into combat in Holland, only to be surrounded in the Battle of the Bulge! He hated the US government and its excesses, but he never dreamed we would be enslaved by a black big eared dictator, He would have been ashamed of todays Americans and I agree totally if we do not fight soon, we dont deserve to be free!
Andy McCarl
6********g
April 25, 2013
"Black big eared dictator".... I hope that your dad wasn't as ignorant as you obviously are.
Robert Schwalbaum
c********t
July 17, 2012
Battle OF Midway.
Robert Schwalbaum
c********t
July 13, 2012
I've never heard anyone comment on the fact that of the four US aicraft carriers in the Pacific fleet on 12/7/41.. NONE were in Pearl Harbor at the time of the attack. These Jap pilots sank a bunch of old uselss battleships.. which had zero effect on the outcome of the war.. except for one important fact. Overnight the people of the USA turned from isolationsim.... to 'Kiil the Japs". That's what won the war.. and convinces me that FDR knew about the attack.
Barbara Vandewalle
1********g
January 29, 2013
There are several books that have proven FDR and Churchill new the Japanese were going to attack Pearl Harbor.
Rick Desper
6********g
January 29, 2013
You've never heard anyone make that comment? I've never heard a discussion of Pearl Harbor that _didn't_ make that comment. I think it's fair to say that FDR was trying to provoke Japan into declaring war. I think it's a stretch to say that they were trying to provoke a sneak attack before war was declared.
Micheal Stone Sr.
1********g
July 3, 2012
In a world that absolutely hates facts and truth it is not easy to make people aware of the histories of both Japan and Germany! Since the inception of historical records these two nations have been aggressors and imperialistic! The attempted transformation after WW2 of these two participants has produced two super powers in the world economy , yet has not and will not in any way change the natural inbred aggression that both will surely manifest if times get tough enough. The very virtues that morph into a united, powerhouse work force can quickly and naturally turn into a galvanized, cohesive military complex!
Jaime Cancio
1********g
July 18, 2012
The problem with history arises from Japanese intentions dating back to 1902 when Japan openly declared they would never go to war with America; here is the real history of note and merit: In 1905 Japan and Germany created a pack of and for world domination and both set their respective nations to making ready for war. Heller, from Germany, in his book "Education in Hell", very clearly disclosed the efforts to make Germany ready for war and that education started with children of five years of age. In Japan when their children reached 20 years of age they had fifteen years of military training, with the Invasion of China they acquired ten years of training in real war. What Americans fail to understand, the level of devotion derrived from all the military training.
Micheal Stone Sr.
1********g
July 22, 2012
good job, most people spout off crap all the time without being well informed on the subject at hand, it's apparent you researched some before commenting!
Jaime Cancio
1********g
August 10, 2012
What I remember most, I was old enough, to hear the stories of men returning from World War II and later Korea; but, as a child I realized very early to pay attention to history. I also remember the three men, each unknown to the others; from their war experiences, each committed suicide - nice men, decent men, Americans and how I could not then understand. John Wayne tainted my world view of war - and then to be the person who first discovered one of these men...and how my world would never be the same. This had to be so true for them and they could not live with the knowledge any more. My Americans, good Americans, were my heroes and to soon I learned there is death at the battlefields and there are deads after the war is over. I learned too, no parent should ever outlive their children.
Nick Glaser
1********g
July 3, 2012
AWESOME.
Admassu Moges
1********g
June 29, 2012
To succeed in life, you need three things: a wishbone, a backbone and a funny bone.
Rick Oltman
1********g
April 9, 2012
A great read is; "Midway: The Battle that Doomed Japan, the Japanese Navy's Story" by Mitsuo Fuchida. Fuchida led the attack on Pearl Harbor and gives great insight into why the Japanese lost the battle of Midway.
Rick Bryan
1********g
April 9, 2012
What a spectacular film!
Lonny LeFever
7********g
January 6, 2012
I always knew my Father had seen thing's and watch as his ship mate gave their lives so we can be free. These young men had to grow up fast, it was do or die. It sadden me that many of those who fought and returned home, have been cheated out of half their SS Money because they were born in the wrong year. Yet, the elected offical have held the ball up knowing that time was on their side. We all talk about what we would do, but when the time comes will we show our passion to be the proud kids of fathers who gave their all, without concern for their selves. It is a shame, but I guess they are part of the 99% destroying the very nation they fought so hard to save. Let's get real, it took way to long for their fight to have a place in our country history and what do they get. F_ _ _ out of the money they paid in.
Ed Hansen
1********g
December 20, 2011
When it comes to FDR, people either loved him or hated him. The one thing he did right was not to enter the war until attacked or seriously provoked. It gained time for the US to ramp up war production, without which, the Allies would not have prevailed. Midway was a coup for our intelligence gatherers and our aviators. And the luck which we had in the timing of the torpedo squadrons, who sacrificed themselves, and the dive bombers who showed up at the right place, at the right time, certainly helped turn the tide of battle in our favor. We shall never see any battles like this anymore. May God have mercy on the souls of both sides who lost their lives.
Ronnie Shearer
1********g
December 13, 2011
A very powerful film and piece of our history. May we never forget these brave soldiers, sailors, and airmen. Well done gentlemen!
Jaime Cancio
1********g
November 22, 2011
After reading many books from both the Japanese and American perspective on Midway I often ask myself how things could have played out differently if the progressive Franklyn Roosevelt would have told the people in the United States what Japan had been up to since 1931 with the invasion of Manchuria; the start of their Japanese Empire building and the true start of World War II! Clearly, with the Japanese "Rape of Nanking" in 1937 and the killing of 440,000 men, women and children in three months, non-combatants all, the course Japan had chosen was clear to all who would have looked at the issue realistically. Today we give Japan favorite status, tell that to the 130,000 Chinese in Nanking, after all hostilities ceased and the World War declared over, Japanese forces leaving Nanking release biological agents that killed Chinese peoples yet again. The same biological agents they wanted to use on the United States. Sad too, all we Americans hear is comdemnation over the internment camps in the United States, but not one word mentioned ever the 1,221 Japanese spys discovered and you never hear of almost 6,000 young Japanese men allowed to return to Japan who then joined the Japanese military to fight against America. Roosevelt pretented false face when it was clearly known the Japanese where sending out spys through out Asia collecting vital information and photographing all military bases and major future infrastructure targets. That men of both sides had to die is only testimony to the failure of governments and their leaders. Still I honor the men of both sides who lost their lifes.
Robert Schwalbaum
c********t
July 13, 2012
Interesting.. I spent some time as a volunteer abpard the USS Missouri at Pearl harbor. There on the "Surrender Deck' is a Picture of the surrender.One day an old Chinese gentleman pointed to the photo.. and said to me.. "we NEVER Forget!"
Jaime Cancio
1********g
July 18, 2012
What I remember most after the war was one day listening to a Chinese women brought to the U.S. after the war that was a day nurse to me. Her entire family, every member of her family and extented family in China, were killed by the Japanese. Save the clothes on her back her world had been destoryed. Today I am ashamed, as nice as that woman was to me I cannot remember her name. What also gribes me; all we hear about in the American are about the detention centers in America and how bad the Japanese Americans were treated. No one mentions that of some 120,000 Japanese Americans detained, 1221 turned out to be spies and approximately 6,000 were allowed to return to Japan to fight against America. The Japanese spies were very effective at Pearl Harbor, in the Phillipines, in the far East nations and what should make every American angry the President of the United States F.D. Roosevelt knew about the spies and what they were up to....and did nothing.
Micheal Stone Sr.
1********g
August 10, 2012
Very good, it's nice to see FDR is not idolized by all!
Jan Senten
1********g
November 28, 2012
Jaime Cancio begt to differ. Please elaborate on 'did nothing'. 30s was the depression and america did biz with japan. china was not a united country. Later, The US govt overstepped the constitutional rights of Japanese citizens, interned them in its zeal to deal with spies.
Richard Bellafiore
1********g
October 5, 2011
a wonderful tribute to brave warriors and a history lesson for those among us who might otherwise forget to remember.