Beyond the Movie: Pearl Harbor

Categories: History, History, Politics
53min | 2001
Explore the real stories, real heroes, real places, and real action underlying the Touchstone Pictures release Pearl Harbor. Did the characters portrayed in the feature film really exist? How did the moviemakers decide when to use real events and when to foray into fiction? National Geographic documents how real life history and fiction came together to make a fascinating story. Spellbinding scenes from the film are juxtaposed with authentic combat footage and insights from historians, combat veterans, top-ranking military personnel, and the film's all-star cast and crew.

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Topics: Film Reviews, Movies About Movies, History_Syndication, Reality
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Comments

David R Allen
David R Allen
December 31, 2012
It's documentaries like this that have undermined National Geographic's reputation as source for accurate, unbiased information. There was no mention of the fact that six years before its release, Kimmel and Short's misconduct charges were dismissed, as declassified information showed that FDR and his minions knew EXACTLY where the Japanese fleet was, but deliberately withheld that information from them. The declassified info also showed that FDR had been following a strategy developed in October 1940 designed to manipulate the Japanese into launching that attack. It is no coincidence that all of the modern American warships were away from the harbour, leaving behind a group of obsolete WW1-era battleships as targets. As for the "massive casualties" described in the documentary, half of them were incurred by the sinking of a SINGLE one of the those obsolete ships (the USS Arizona). What's curious, is given that there were ~2500 fatalities, it is pretty odd that there were only ~700 other wounded - usually the ratio is the other way around. TWICE as many Federal troops were killed by the Confederates in the first 30 minutes of the Battle of Cold Harbor nearly 80 years earlier (well before the invention of aircraft armed w/bombs and machine guns). If it weren't for the loss of that single ship, the casualties would have been considered trivial. Such hyperbole does nothing for the National Geographic Society's reputation as a reliably serious, scientific organization.
Mitchell Mayo
Mitchell Mayo
October 2, 2012
It must be the truth about American Stupidity?