Record Store Day: The Documentary

Categories: Documentary, Music, History
27min | 2011
RECORD STORE DAY - THE DOCUMENTARY uses archival footage and current interviews with leaders of music explaining an audiophile's holiday and some of their favorite records and what Record Store Day means to them.

Topics: Fans, Bands, Interviews, Performance, Song, Records, Music Videos, Artist
Reviews: B 1 Fans
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karen halsey
karen halsey
November 30, 2013
D
Ron Barrow
Ron Barrow
May 13, 2012
is writing a book, tenatively titled"rock n' roll ruint my life"about how I grew up listening to lp's, where I was, who I was with, which records we listened to.i think the 1st lp's I ever bought were pink floyd, the who, moby grape's 1st, the doors, hendrix, cream, buffalo springfield.later I got into a lot of genres, psychedelia, garage rock, punk., country...the list goes on.i still have quite a few of the original lp's, despite being robbed, more than once, i have a lot of the really good stuff.and, yes, i do still buy &listen to vinyl! viva vinyl! and I hope to get serious about the book, really soon.still like that as a working title.....ok.
Yo Saxman
Yo Saxman
May 13, 2012
is there a hook to this novel? sounds like something a lot of ppl can relate to, but u shouldn't blame it all on rock n roll. sex, drugs played a roll in there somewhere im sure.
Ron Barrow
Ron Barrow
May 13, 2012
you,sir,are correct.LOTS of sex & drugs......
Ron Barrow
Ron Barrow
May 13, 2012
..and jail,parenthood,insanity,all those dumb bands i played in,my politics,my life now.i should be dead,but i'm not.probably not any"hook",really.and i'm not blaming anything,or anyone.it's just a diary,really.hope that helps clear things up,from that perspective.do you know any publishers?!!ok.namaste,my friend.
Marlene Drell Frykman
Marlene Drell Frykman
May 13, 2012
sounds like a book people tell me i should write too - minus the jail part. nobody would believe it if they read it.
Ron Barrow
Ron Barrow
May 13, 2012
ah,you did'nt miss anything,anyway.
Yo Saxman
Yo Saxman
May 13, 2012
@[100002239338721:2048:Ron Barrow] , memoirs are outta vogue with pubbers these days. I'd suggest u self-pub. put it out in eBook first, see how it goes. Check out Smashwords.com. If you get some interest, go with createspace.com for paperback. that gets you on Amazon. but first you have to write it. I take it this is your first book? Writing a title is the easy part. next comes the opening sentence, which is all most pubbers and readers read. Check out some o f my stuff, you'll get the idea. www.jguevaranovels.com writing and playing music similar. I just figured out how to take a sax solo on a comp keyboard, is all. same game/different name.
Ron Barrow
Ron Barrow
May 14, 2012
maybe it'll sell more,when i'm dead.thanx for the shout out &linx!!namaste.
Robin Morris
Robin Morris
April 22, 2012
This film far surpassed my expectations and was really beautiful and held my interest. To play the game as in the film: the first record I ever bought was probably a 45- maybe "the first of may" by the bee gees but the first album I remember buying was "smashing the Amps" , bought at Raskolnikov's Records, before Rasputin's... It cost 3.50 new, on blue heavy vinyl, in a mustard yellow jacket with a xerox of Jimi for a cover. I still have it- that was 1972, this is now...the music was from 1968's Albert Hall concert...Bleeding Heart...anyhow, I bought a boot of Dyla called Blind Boy Grunt and the hawks...took it through customs in my suitcase- the guy pulled it out like he was going to take it...then gave it back...that wa 1978...I still have that one too. Vinyl- you remember so much around each record...33s seem that they must remain an immortal form, one not to be trashed by the waves of digital technocracy...whaddyou think?
Kevin O'Conner
Kevin O'Conner
April 21, 2012
Now the shops and the labels (ESPECIALLY the labels) need to work together so that record-shop customers can enjoy the same kinds of prices they can find online. The misguided policies of the labels, which have emphasized immediate release-week sales and immediate sales/profits over actual artist development—along with a "let's throw everything against the wall and see what sticks" approach to marketing—are what killed the likes of Tower, Peaches, Virgin Megastore, and The Wherehouse, among others. Throw in the Loudness Wars (I have no doubt that the physical limitations of the vinyl format, which make the kind of brickwalling found on too many CDs impossible, have contributed to that format's minor resurgence), and it's amazing that so many of the indie shops have managed to remain afloat.