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Tell Me And I Will Forget

Tell Me And I Will Forget
1:14:00 | 2010

Categories: Documentary, War

Shot on board with the paramedics of Pretoria and Johannesburg, TELL ME AND I WILL FORGET illuminates the new social challenges in South Africa, 15 years after the end of its oppressive Apartheid era. Desperate human circumstance and a wave of violent crime have put immense pressure on the medical system, which is now as divided as the country's dual economy. With the ongoing US medical debate, the documentary provides a timely look into the much less glamorous side of the nation that hosted the 2010 World Cup Football Games.

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n********m
March 10, 2016
A

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f********e
February 1, 2016
A

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c********m
January 9, 2016
A+
Two days before I'm going into an EMT class, I stumble upon this film. I'm going into this head-on, am already cynical and jaded to various hospital settings and just before I start to think it's a mistake this gem ends up in my hands. (literally too, because PS Vita,) Every person is important to this film, the patients and EMS personal, but certainly my two favorite paramedics shown are polar opposites. One understandably miserable with the state of the country and cynical, the other paramedic, who's optimistic and reminds me why I wanted to get into the medical field. I won't spoil much, but its apparent from the beginning of the film that public EMS are struggling from the obviously shitty environment and workload, where private healthcare providers are prepared and equipped with half the workload. Before responding to calls, the subjects of the documentary reminisce about the old EMS and of buildings and neighborhoods which are decaying rapidly right in front of you; while more intense parts of the film come not just from the emergencies they respond to, but frustrated civilians . This aint a happy flick, some moments of the movie are graphic, some are outright depressing (I can think of one scene where a female paramedic talks about how she prepares for assault), and don't say we didn't warn you. In short, poverty stinks, people turn to crime for money, the EMS system is collapsing under its own weight while its growing a fraction of what urban areas are, and no amount of counseling can help these magnificent bastards from doing their job under demanding psychological strains.

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