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War Zone

War Zone
1:16:00 | 1998

Categories: Documentary, Arts and Culture

WAR ZONE is about sex, power, and what happens when men - either knowingly or unknowingly - threaten a woman's right to walk undisturbed on the streets.  What exactly do catcalls, leers, or a whole litany of other behaviors mean to a woman?  And why do men engage in these behaviors? Shot all over the United States, Maggie Hadleigh-West turns her camera on men in the same way that they turn their aggression on her. WAR ZONE is 76 minutes of explosive footage as the filmmaker places herself in very real danger by daring to ask the men on the streets why they are treating a complete stranger in a sexual way.  In the process, she has been hit, yelled at, apologized to and engaged in mesmerizing conversations with the men that have harassed her.  Through these conversations, Hadleigh-West reveals the anger, fear and frustration as well as the affection, admiration and humor that characterizes relationships between men and women. This movie is guaranteed to get men and women talking about their often very different experiences in public.

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Reviews: B 49 Fans
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d********m
July 17, 2016
A
Brilliant approach, it depicts the cultures of objectification of the women's bodies and the socially acceptable norm of men exerting power either by catcalling or sexually harassing that solidifies and perpetuates this objectification. I also like the distress of most of those men who are being confronted with their sexist acts, which shows to me that they probably know catcalling, etc, are harmful but will bring up any unreasonable and pretentious argument that comes to mind in order to excuse and defend their behavior.

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r********m
May 9, 2016
A+

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m********m
November 24, 2015
An incredibly genuine, well made film. I have never experienced anything that so accurately and intimately captures women's daily struggle with sexual harrassment in public. Maggie Hadleigh-West puts into words the very problem that women are told does not exist.

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