Let Fury Have the Hour

1hr 27min | 2012
In his feature directorial debut, author and visual artist Antonino D'Ambrosio spins a lively social history that chronicles how a generation of artists, thinkers, and activists channeled their creativity into an organized response and resistance to the reactionary politics that increasingly defined American culture in the 1980s. This idea of art as political statement came to be known as "creative response," and, through insightful and energetic interviews with more than 50 influential creative voices, D'Ambrosio traces the movement from its earliest inklings in the Reagan-Thatcher era through three decades of social and political change.

An exuberant mixed media collage that incorporates graphic art, music, animation, and spoken word, LET FURY HAVE THE HOUR is a distinctive perspective on an era in time, retelling the history of modern America through the voices of the artists that interpreted and influenced it through their work, including Shepard Fairey, Eve Ensler, Wayne Kramer, Edwidge Danticat, John Sayles, Chuck D, Tom Morello, Lewis Black, and dozens more. D'Ambrosio's stylish and inspirational film pays due homage to the parallel creative history of late 20th-century America in the words and work of the artists themselves.

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Topics: Politics, Art, Pop Culture, Closed Caption, 1980s, Visual Performance, Social Activism, Tribeca Film Festival, Lewis Black
Reviews: A 3 Fans
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Ted Moore
Ted Moore
April 21, 2014
A
Josephine Pizzino
Josephine Pizzino
April 17, 2014
A
Uplifting doc chronicling the shifting social changes since Regan/Thacher's regimes. The folks interviewed range widely but share the themes of community over individualism and how to implement that in a hostile world. Chuck D, Wayne Madison, Eve Esler, John Sayles and on and on. Plus great footage and musical moments. Kick out the jams,, futhermuckers!
James Niklam
James Niklam
April 14, 2014
A